Bulova “Commodore” From 1953

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Bulova made its “Commodore” model for many years, from the early 1930’s through the 1950’s and perhaps even later.  As with many others of their named models, the design of the “Commodore” changed down through the years.

By the early 1950s, Bulova introduced this particular “Commodore” model, which proved to be popular enough to continue for the better part of the decade, in this same form.

Why did this 1950’s “Commodore” model appeal so successfully to the watch buying public?

Perhaps it was the price, which was under $40.00, a very good deal for a 10k rolled gold plate cased Swiss watch at that time.

Possibly, it was due to the center sweep second hand, which was not unheard of but still coming into vogue in the early ’50’s.  Certainly it was no where near the standard expectation for men’s wrist watches, which still mostly had a sub second hand dial at the six position.

Maybe it was the fancy lug design; like fins on cars, fancy lugs on men’s watches were all the rage in the 1950’s.  The “Commodore” has fancy scroll shaped lugs that proved to be fancy enough to satisfy the desire for this stylistic feature over the course of most of the decade.

And all of these came with a dependable 17 jewels Swiss movement.  It was a good convergence of style, value and accuracy.

Considering the fact that the “Commodore” in this 1950’s incarnation was a stalwart of the Bulova stable, it is surprising how few of them appear on the vintage watch market today.  This L3 (1953) “Commodore” is from an old Western Pennsylvania estate, in very fine untouched original condition from its winding crown to the Hadley expansion band.

Read more about it here: 1953 BULOVA COMMODORE

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